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washington works, someone who has these relationships, someone who can get on the phone and get the president of the united states to pardon, you know, your fugitive client, that's a very, very marketable commodity. i mean, if you see -- if you are seen as someone who knows how this town works, someone who is a usual suspect in this town, you can dine out for years. that's why no one leaves. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information a
in washington, tonight on "washington week." more red lines crossed in syria. >> what we've seen indicates big eventis clearly a of grave concern. when you start seeing chemical weapons used on a large scale and, again, we're still gathering our information about this particular event, but it is very troublesome. >> there's no reason, if there's hide, for the regime not to let the investigative team in. gwen: more tough choices in egypt. >> what we're doing right now is theg a full evaluation of u.s.-egyptian relationship. >> we have the same objective. to see a democratic system in place in egypt. it ahn mccain and i called coup because that's exactly what it is. gwen: and new disclosures about ofernment surveillance american citizens. >> i think that the trust of the american people in their at staket is what's here. gwen: a trio of late summer dilemmas, plus -- 50 year later, we look back at the march may have changed america. gjelten the week, tom of npr, alexis simendinger of real clear politics and michael fletcher of "the washington post." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, coveri
reporting. >>> also tonight, 50 years after the march on washington, old warriors and a new generation unite to consider the long path of progress and the road ahead. this is the 900-page document we call obamacare. it could change costs, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts. >> caller: the water -- it requires this new warning. >> the pressure tonight continues to build on syria as other nations demand an investigation into suspicions of a chemical weapons attack. you've seen those gruesome pictures that show hundreds of dead men, women and children and they have raised alarm. while other violence have claimed many more lives and many more made homeless. >>> the united nations reports that child refugees have reached 1 million and satellite images of the az zaaingstari refugee camp. >> the united nations says over half the syrian refugees in jordan are under the age o
the anniversary of the "i have a dream" speech and the famous march on washington. that pivotal moment in history signaled a turning point in the nation's civil right movement with a quarter of million people marming for equal rights. as it was back then, many are getting set now to speak out on dr. king's dream. and the movement. the march begins shortly down independence avenue, passing the new martin luther king memorial and winds up at the washington monument. that is where doug mckelway is standing by on what is a gorgeous day in our nation's capital city. hi, doug. >> it is a gorgeous day. a spectacular day for the event today. the march on washington in 1963 was the single largest gathering of people in washington up until that time. i'll let the ambulance pass by here. join me as i step on the curb here. all right. there we go. there have been largeer crowds sincebe that day but up until that time it was the largest crowd. the national park service stopped measuring crowd size since the million man march because they were criticized to overestimate size crowd by some groups and underestim
bera now, do you think we can find george washington, thomas jefferson, james madison, george mason, john marshall, and patrick henry? we ain't going to find them. on some theoretical version, they are there. that is human being with the capacity for leadership are there, but the situation doesn't permit that group to rise to the surface. the question is, why did that situation exist in 1776? now, there is the answer to this, which is that great leadership only emerges during times of great crisis. this makes imminent sense, the pressure that the crisis creates. yet, we can all think of the examples where there's a great crisis, and there's no leadership, like now. [laughter] [applause] or the coming of world war i in europe. what was special, you can't say there was something special in the water back there then. you can't say god looked down upon the american colonies and blessed them. i mean, supernatural explanations are not admitted, even if you're an evangelical, you cannot use those in the historical conversation. i don't know whether i have a good answer to this. some is in
the point i was trying to make before the washington redskins have the ball, 10 1/2 minutes, the buffalo bills, 4 1/2 minutes. and there is the pop. >> chick: min griltd with the big hit. >> joe: that's the point now. if you run this up tempo offense, you know, you better stay on. these guys are gassed. you get into the third quarter, get into the fourth quarter, and it's a 10-5 ratio, that's a lot of football being played by the defense. buffalo has 8 first downs. it is a great theory if you can adhere to it but you have to get first downs. >> chick: choice with the carry herewashington redskins may remember him. had he a cuff of coffee here. and three in and three out. with that series, nothing over five yards. they have not tried to go over the field. they have run by david emerson a couple of times. one of the guys is marcus easley, number 81, he has not played a lot. he will probably get some more. >> chick: and the sean powell. powell with the punt of 48 yards. we'll take a timeout here and pat white now back here ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing live tv from southwest. n
the dream and the dreamer 50 years later. >> thousands of people making their way through washington, d.c. for days of festivities marking that historic speech from dr. martin about howg jr. and the march on much this day this movement has changed life for africa americans. what has it meant for if you? >> well, the original march was a turning point for me in my life because it was the first time that i was able to really stand up for what i believed. i knew it was right. i knew it was right to my bones to go to >> yeah 7. >> for his take on today's event gas thevent, for the first timee have whites and blacks in intimate settings, allowed to go to church together, organize together, it was those relationships away from the camera, away from the microphones that allowed folks to get to know each other in ways that they hadn't been able to get to know each other before. >> reporter: mr. neil there is so much emphasis on dr. king, but the movement took place in basements around the countriers people who were afraid they would lose their jobs. >> these are folks who were organizers at the
, is to follow the efforts in washington today to present all of the options. >> so you do believe there would have to be a man date first from an international body? >> that's what he has said. if he can't get the united neighborhoods there are other man datas he could look for. >> is at this point all hope for diplomatic solution lost. >> it's very hard to see a diplomatic solution. the opposition has dis united. the government made up its mind to crush the rebellions and uprisings that were occurring around at a time country. it's going to be very hard to get people negotiating for a solution. >> all right. ambassador richard murphy, we thank you so much for coming in this morning. >> pleasure. >>> it's shaping up to be a beautiful morning across the northeast. high pressure is in control. and we continue to deal with nothing but sunshine. take a look. hard to find anything here on the radar. clear skies. we did have a cold front push through earlier on the week. luckily, now, the skies are shaping up. it's going to be a gorgeous day temperaturewise, nice and comfortable. in albany, 76. new
. ♪ >>> welcome back to a special edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington: the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton continuing our special coverage live from the lincoln memorial on the national mall. 50 years ago, the eyes of the nation were on this spot where hundreds of thousands of people converged on history. people of all races from all walks of life joining hands in the name of justice and civil rights. in this hour, we'll hear from some of the people who traveled so far to attend this march. including the young girl shown in this iconic photo. i'll talk to her now 50 years later about how the march changed her life. we also have my interview with congressman john lewis from the steps of lincoln memorial where he spoke a half a century ago. i'm honored to begin the second hour of our show tonight with bernie a. king, ceo of the king center. thank you for being here today. >> thank you. glad to be here. >> you head the king center where your mother founded many years ago. and you have struggled and worked to keep the legacy of your mother and father alive. an
to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. i et a man not long ago, tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, you're right. civil rights didn't write your resume. but civil rights made somebody ead your resum
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial, and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to celebrate that historic event. >>> we start in syria where the government is now accusing rebel forces of using chemical weapons. the claim comes as president obama meets with his national security team at the white house to talk about the reports of chemical weapons attacks by the syrian government. syrian state tv says soldiers found chemical weapons in tunnels used by rebels. cnn cannot confirm those claims or the authenticity of these images. the opposition claims government forces launched a nerve gas attack, killing hundreds of civilians. meanwhile a top u.n. official is in damascus today asking to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons by the syrian government. president obama sat down with our chris kuomo earlier and he said the u.s. is still gathering information on the attack. >> what we've seen indicates that this is clearly a big event of grave concern. and we are already in communications with the entire international community. we're moving through the u.n. t
cord, tacoma washington. >> a short time okay t hamid karzi reacted to the bales' sentencing >> a life sentence to him or a death sentence to him will not bring back our children that he killed. if will not bring back the happiness of those families and will not replace the loss that the afghan nation suffered. >>> karzi also said he does not back capital punishment and asked that the u.s. provided compensation to the families of those killed. >>> the sentencing phase of the trial begins made for major nadal hassan. a military jury found him guilty of killing 13 fellow soldiers in 2009. hassan admitted to the murders in court and had no reaction on friday when the guilty verdict was red. the jury will now decide if he will be executed for his crimes or spend the rest of his life in prison. >>> washington state police are hunting for a teenager who is suspected of beating an 88-year-old world war ii veteran to death. another teenager is already in custody for the crime. police found the veteran in his car on wednesday with serious injuries. he died in the hospital yesterday. so far, police do no
. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. ♪ >> people of all races, regular people from all walks of life, marching against injustice, marching to change history. >> we are the moral revolution. >> how long? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to ask and a call for peace. a word that inspired a people, a nation and the entire world. >> free at least, free at least. thank god almighty we are free at least. >> tonight a special hour-hour toll particulars nation. the march on washington. the dream continues. >>> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. first years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am right now watching history. millions more watching at home, seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement. call for justice and equality. i talked to him from the exact spot where he can spoke 50 years ago. and we'll hear some of the young people who traveled hundreds of miles to help change the course of history. i'm honored to begin the show tonight with martin luther king iii and reverend joseph lowry, who mean cal
memorial in washington, d.c., where we all try to advance the dream. >>> good evening from new york. i'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in," as the struggle for low-wage employees continues, fast food worker strikes demanding higher wages spread across the country. my guess tonight is the former ceo of mcdonald's, who says raising the minimum wage will kill jobs. i disagree, and that's coming up. >>> also tonight, this weekend we commemorate the 50th anniversary on the civil rights march on washington. tonight, a look at a half century of racial progress. how far we have come and how far we have yet to go. >>> but we begin tonight with president obama, who just a few hours ago completed the last of four speeches in two days about something that is increasing the source of high anxiety for middle class families, the cost of higher education. >> over the last three decades, the cost of higher education has gone up 260% at a time when family incomes have gone up about 16%. >> the president may have been slightly understating just how bad it is. while the cost of a private non-profit four-ye
, that is the future we must move toward no matter where it is. tom foreman, cnn, washington. >>> hello, again, a look at our top stories now. in california, a raging wildfire is exploding in size and spreading inside the yosemite national park. it has been 50 years on the east coast since martin luther king jr. made his famous speech and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to secelebre that historic event and marian berry joining us live later on this hour. in california, a wildfire is burning almost out of control through parts of the state. the rim fire is burning so fast, it has doubled in size in a day. the fire has also spread to the western edge of the park. nick has been following developments for us. >> reporter: fred, is sun has come up here and it's given us a fresh perspective of how devastating the fire has been. this goes back a couple hundred yards at least and it's going things like this, scorching the earth and singeing the edges. at least 126,000 acres burned and it's been very unforgiving in its pattern. you see here, fire completely jumped over this road, scorched
at the washington monument. marking 50 years since hundreds of thousands of americans descend order the national mall to hear the reverend dr. martin luther king deliver one of the most famous speeches in american history. some of the thousands in washington were actually there on august 28, 1963. as we take a look at the scenes from 50 years ago and many on hand today who weren't even born yet. all celebrating the great strides america has made on race since the darkest days of the civil rights era. and also acknowledging their there is much more that can and must be done. we will go live to the washington monument in just a few minutes. we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital where president obama has been holding a meeting that could have phonily major implication as he and his national security team discuss reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria. and at an investigation that could soon lead to some kind of u.s. military response. hello. i'm kelly wright. welcome to a brand new hour of "america's news headquarters." >> i'm heather chillders. u.n. investigators arrive
in washington, d.c., where events are already underway for the 50th anniversary march on washington. thousands of people are gathered here already, with more continuing to stream in. among those scheduled to speak today are martin luther king iii, merly evers williams, the reverend al sharpton, attorney general eric holder, and john lewis. the only person to speak at the original march who is still alive today. here he is in 1963. >> by the forces of our demand, our determination, and our numbers, we shall splinter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we
on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ballistic missiles into
the march on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ball
march on y of the washington. we will be joined by clarence lusane. ♪ashingt"washington journal" is. host: the lincoln memorial, a key part of the march 50 years ago, a key part of the event today. commemorating the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. live coverage starts at nine on c-span three, part of american history tv. we will devote part of this program to the topic of the march, as well as the civil rights act. for the first 45 minutes we are turning to politics. john boehner, in a conference call with republican lawmakers, told a group he plans to craft a short-term bill that would fund the government, avoiding a government shutdown. for our next 45 minutes, we are interested in hearing from republicans only. the acttalk about itself, the larger implications of the funding of the health- care law, but we want to get your thoughts on our phone line. here's how you can do so. it is republicans only. if you live in the eastern and central time zone, it is 202- 585-3880. if you live in the pacific or mountain time zone, it is 202- 585-3881. you can reach us on twitter
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
. behind the headlines: the march on washington: 50 years later. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, a ceo's feisty photo creates controversy. did yahoo! c.e.o. marissa strike the wrong pose for "vogue" magazine. lying backwards on a lounge chair sporting stilettos and a pouty face, mayer was photographed for a profile piece in the fashion magazine. critics argue her picture perpetuates the stereotype that high profile women rise to the top based on looks. others say there's nothing wrong there's nothing wrong with a female c.e.o. embracing her femininity. but mayer received some good news late in the week; yahoo surpassed google in july as the most visited website in the united states. even better news, yahoo stock has doubled in the year since mayer became ceo. so debra, was her decision to strike the pose in "vogue" or ratings booster for the website? >> i really think she was fine in what she did. i don't think it really mataries whole lot and if it gave her some more notoriety and publicit
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
and the dreamer, 50 years later. [♪ music ] >> and welcome to al jazeera. we're in washington, d.c. for this historic day as thousands make their way to the nation's capitol to remembering down independence avenue and casting the mlk memorial which was there 50 years ago. then they'll address the exactlt today means 50 years later. >> racism now is has raised its head in vicious ways, but in the language of politicians. we need the constitutional right to vote. we cannot let the voting right go back. we need the constitutional right to vote. we need to fight the war on poverty. young people with good minds can't afford to go to school. revival the civil rights commission and a ban of foreclosing on urban america. it's not so said there is much that needs to be changed by america. >> this movement is broader. it's african-americans, it's latinos, it's also whites who share progressive beliefs in the values of freedom and justice. it's asians and american indians and native americans. it's a broader movement, a stronger movement, and also a movement that i think we're really determ
. getting ready for the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, "the new york times" website today posted that paper's original coverage, their coverage in the paper from the day that the march happened, back in 1963. and, of course, what's funny about the coverage, looking back on it now. funny/creepy/funny/creepy is how obsessed "the times" was and ow obsessed all of the mainstream media was. how relevant it felt to point out over and over again how nice the whole thing was. this emphasis is out of control. "it was an orderly washington rally." "the leaders of march called on congress with courtesy." "congress responded cordially." "it was an occupying army of marchers on washington, but it was polite." "politeness is the order of the day." "even the traffic control worked smoothly." "disorders were at a minimum." "only four arrested, including a nazi." oh, see, only the nazis were getting arrested. that was a fine day for a walk to the national mall. it is sometimes easier to see in history than it is up close while stuff is happening. but tactics matter in politics. strategy ma
anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom. in 1963, more than 200,000 people of all ages, races, sexes, and sexual orientations gathered here peacefully, or, orderly, as the press reported it back then, right where i'm sitting today. i'm honored to be joined by this afternoon by some of the people who helped make that an historic day, as well as some of the people who continued dr. king's work, as we honor the past and we look forward. but first, a look at the present. one of those continuing dr. king's work is his son, dr. martin luther king iii, reflecting earlier on how much work we still have to do to achieve his father's vision from 50 years ago. let's take a listen. >> the vision preached by my father a half century ago was that his four little children would one day live in a nation where they would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. however, sadly, the tears of trayvon martin's mother and father remind us that far too frequently, the color of one's skin remains a license to profile, to arrest, and to even murder with n
on washington, new civil rights leaders descend on the lincoln memorial where martin luther king, jr. once told us he had a dream. >> come on, let's go! >>> the fast-moving wildfire that has consumed 165 square miles has entered yosemite national park. and having doubled in size in just one day, it's now bearing down on thousands of structures. >>> she was tried, convicted and monday she'll be back in court. now jane velez-mitchell reveals new details about jodi arias that show how a previous boyfriend may have narrowly escaped her clutches. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm brianna kheiler. >> and i'm ivan watson. it's 10:00 p.m. on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. and you're in the cnn newsroom. >> let freedom ring. >> and we begin this hour with history being made again today in the nation's capital. >> that's right. marchers are retracing the landmark 1963 march on washington. it was 50 years ago wednesday that the reverend martin luther king, jr. called for an end to hatred and bigotry in his "i have a dream" speech. >> chris is on the mall. chris, participants are exchanging words, but the
>>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" live from washington, d.c. it's the last ed show on a saturday. let's get to work. >>> i have a dream today! >> the dream can only be realized if we pay attention to what's going on in our own backyard. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way! make some noise! >> you cannot have economic and political equality without having some form of social equality. >> stand tall in your community, fight for diversity, understand its strength. >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that men are made to live together as brothers. >> 50 years later, we need a team effort to make his dream come true. >> their march is now our march. >> so on the anniversary of the march on washington, our grandchildren will not be fighting the same fight. >> we must give our young people dreams again. >> i have a dream that we shall overcome. >> i stand here today in this sacred place, in my father's footsteps. >> my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will n
look for answers at the seat of power. we're always adding burdens, who is we, washington, when they don't let a came around. there is so much money here, life is good >> john: we start with myth number 7 because americans are so fat it's government'sob to help us eat better. > changing old habits is never easy. >> john: no, it's not. so the first lady says to change behavior. >> it's going to take government doing its part. >> john: if michelle obama wants to inspire us by exercising on the white house lawn, that is great but with government it's force. >> this is not banning what you are buying but simply the size of the cup that can be used. >> john: in my hometown, they are upset about big cups of soda. they want big cups illegal. >> this is biggest thing to curb obesity. >> john: i can buy two of these, that is 32 ounces around i can buy one of these. how does this curb obesity? >> my mayor is proud he has forced every chain restaurant to clearly post calorie koonth. >> there were few skeptics but now they are national models. >> joh that sadly that true. under obamacare al
, washington. >> 50 years after martin luther king's historic speech on washington. to take stock of how much has changed. we have clericaler weather for the northeast and mid addlantic but the rain continues to be very heavy for certain parts of the states. i will show you where coming up next. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> the political scandal that has gripped los angeles says filner's trouble, far from over. >> the ag's office won't specify charges but that an investgation is ongoing. meanwhile, city officials here in san diego say they are ready to put the civic nightmare behind them. the city council unanimously approved a resolution in which bob filner resigned effective august 30th. under the terms of the deal, the city will pay for his legal defense with regard to claims by current and former city employees. however,
on washington, 50 years later people around the country reflect on martin luther king's dream. >> well to al jazeera, we're just days away from the 50th anniversary of that famous "i have a dream" speech. people are make thinking way to washington, d.c. thousands of people in fact, and our del walters is there talking to people about why it's so important for them to relive history, and how far have we come and how much further do we have to go? >> reporter: hey, richelle, what it is is a day of soaring temperatures and rhetoric on the mall much like it must have been 50 years ago. i watched it at home with my family as did hundreds of thousands african-americans or as we were called back then, negro or colored, and then blacks or african-americans. the crowds stretch from the lincoln memorial down to the moment. which is a distance of a mile. they started coming at 7:00 and they began to trickle to a sea of humanity that is now engaged in a familiar theme, and that is change has to come to washington. change has to come to america. that was the theme echoed some 50 years ago. one who spoke
and jobs come back. >> we have seen this in new york city and washington, d.c. if you take an area and turn it in a place with business and people employ and have jobs to get young people in workplace to keep them busy it's very important. going to the arguement that juan has made all week, the kids from the single parent homes are likely to live in poverty and commit crimes. this costs us money in lives and dollars. >> eric: juan, if you apply to this horrific killing that happened outside of oklahoma city, where three young people shot someone for fun, how does it apply? >> these are teenagers. one father in the courtroom said my son could haven't done it. wake up, dude. c'mon. we have kids online, spewing all kind of hateful messages. no structure around them. they are bore and think it's okay to tracksome somebody like an animal and kill them. sick. >> eric: important word that juan used. they were "bored." that's because they weren't working. >> true. >> you have to get them involved, too. i don't care, it could be community work. you could do anything. it requires some kind of leaders
obama out there for the problems in washington. >> i'm willing to do whatever it takes to get congress and republicans in congress in particular it, to think less about politics and party and think more about what's good for the country. i have made this argument to my republican friends privately. and by the way sometimes they say to me privately i agree with you. but i'm worried about a primary from somebody in the tea party back in my district. >> with us now to react, cathy aru. the founder of catalina magazine and contributing editor to the "the washington post." so after five years, don't you think the blame game is getting a little old? >> well, actually, it's not a blame game. it it's a branding game. and he is branding the republican party, what they really are right now is almost the tea party. the rush limbaugh party. the fringe party. the no party. so it's not really a blame game. it's real little a branding game. and it's true. >> you think it's working? because can i tell you i was there for three years. >> right. >> scott: i know the president. obviously i have met the p
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